Egypt Local GuideEgypt Local Guide
Forgot password?

Activities in Aswan

Accommodations

Abc Vacances Discount

Nunc cursus libero purus ac congue arcu cursus ut sed vitae pulvinar massa idporta nequetiam.

MORE

Tours

Aswan Airport Transfer

Relax on your landing or takeoff with our private airport transfer service. we provide our clients with comfort, safety and great quality services whether traveling for business or for pleasure. All our vehicles are modern and our drivers are proficient and very much prepared to give best driving experience .

MORE

Trip to Nubian Village by Motorboat

Take a day trip from Aswan on an Egyptian sailboat and visit a Nubian village on Soheil Island. Enjoy the scenery on the river and get a closer look at Nubian village life.

MORE

Sound and Light Show at Philae Temple

Have you ever wondered what life have been thousands years ago? You will know about it through the creation of sound and light laser data show at Philae Temple.

MORE

Private Tour to Abu Simbel from Aswan

Join our small group tour to Abu Simbel from Aswan by a modern A/C coach early in the morning to visit the two rock-carved temples at Abu Simbel. These temples are unique both in style and in their setting on the banks of Lake Nasser

MORE

Aswan, Philae Temple High Dam and Nubian Museum

Enjoy a one day Tour to Aswan the beautiful peaceful southern city and visit the fantastic temple of Goddess Isis on Philae Island , visit the High Dam the ideal example of Modern engineer and have an exclusive tour to the Nubian Museum

MORE

Things to Do

Temple of Derr

Location :

This Temple is located 208 KM south of Aswan , It was moved to a new location close to Amada temple .
Who built it?

This temple was built during the time of king Ramsis II , exactly during the 30th year of his reign.
Why it was built?

It was dedicated to god Ptah and god Amon , as well as Ramsis II as a deified person.
Explanation :

The ancient Egyptians named this temple “Temple of Ramses-in-the-House-of-Re”.

It was cut into a cliff, the remaining parts now are consisting of two pillared halls and the rear sanctuaries. One of the two pillars is cut into the rock. The third row consists of engaged Osiride Pillars of Ramesses II that are larger than the others. This is a typical theme in many of his Nubian temples.

 

The second hall follows the axis of the temple. It contains six tapered pillars, mounted on projecting bases and surmounted by transverse architrave.

 

The ceiling was covered with stucco and then painted with a series of vultures along the center axis, while the upper part of the walls runs a frieze of uraus alternating with the royal cartouche of Ramesses II. Lower on the walls are scenes of a religious motif, including Ramesses II’s jubilees, his purification and the reception of the bark. Also there are other scenes depict Shu, Tefnut and Montu.

On the sides of the pillars are depictions of Pharaoh and a deity, including Weret-hekau, Menhit, Ptah and Amun-Re.

 

Like other Nubian temples, some of the temple’s decorations were lost due to its use as a church by early Christians.

Location :

This Temple is located 208 KM south of Aswan , It was moved to a new location close to Amada temple .
Who built it?

This temple was built during the time of king Ramsis II , exactly during the 30th year of his reign.
Why it was built?

It was dedicated to god Ptah and god Amon , as well as Ramsis II as a deified person.
Explanation :

The ancient Egyptians named this temple “Temple of Ramses-in-the-House-of-Re”.

It was cut into a cliff, the remaining parts now are consisting of two pillared halls and the rear sanctuaries. One of the two pillars is cut into the rock. The third row consists of engaged Osiride Pillars of Ramesses II that are larger than the others. This is a typical theme in many of his Nubian temples.

 

The second hall follows the axis of the temple. It contains six tapered pillars, mounted on projecting bases and surmounted by transverse architrave.

 

The ceiling was covered with stucco and then painted with a series of vultures along the center axis, while the upper part of the walls runs a frieze of uraus alternating with the royal cartouche of Ramesses II. Lower on the walls are scenes of a religious motif, including Ramesses II’s jubilees, his purification and the reception of the bark. Also there are other scenes depict Shu, Tefnut and Montu.

On the sides of the pillars are depictions of Pharaoh and a deity, including Weret-hekau, Menhit, Ptah and Amun-Re.

 

Like other Nubian temples, some of the temple’s decorations were lost due to its use as a church by early Christians.

MORE

Temple of Wadi El-Sebua

The name in Arabic means “Valley of the Lions”, referring to the avenue of sphinxes that leads up to this temple, which was built during the reign of Ramesses II. Though it was moved to its current location only in the1960’s, it was quickly forgotten and neglected.

By the time it became a frequent tourist attraction again in the 1990’s when cruises started running on Lake Nasser, it was partially filled with sand. The affect of its unkempt appearance and remote location is to give visitors the feeling that they are themselves discovering this temple for the first time.

The temple is partially constructed out of stone blocks, but the inner sanctuary is actually carved into the bedrock. Originally, the temple offered three pylons, but only two of them survive.The first leading to the avenue of sphinxes is no longer here, but the second, leading into a forecourt decorated by statues of Ramesses II and the third, revealing to a second courtyard supported by columns decorated by images of Ramesses as Osiris remain.

The hypostyle hall and inner sanctuary that follow these courtyards were carved into the bedrock.

Nearby Wadi El-Seboua is the Temple of Dakka, which was built during the Ptolemaic era in the third century BCThis site is notable because of the huge and well-preserved pylon that remains here. You can climb on top of the pylon to enjoy impressive views of the surrounding landscape with the desert in one direction and the lake in the other.

MORE

Nubian Monuments

Location:
It is stretched between Aswan and Abusimbel at Nasser lake .

Who built it?
This place contains many monuments built by different kings through different periods, the most famous King was RamsessII of the 19th Dynasty.

Why it was built : 
Every temple has its dedication God or Goddess, but most of them dedicate for God Amon-Ra .

Explanation:
When the High Dam was being built, many of these temples were moved during the salvage operation between 1964 and 1968. This was due to the rising waters of Lake Nasser .

There are many Temples south Aswan which you can visit by a taxi or bus like Kalabsha Temple , Beit Al Wali Temple and Kiosk of Kertassi . There are many other monuments you have to visit by Lake Nasser Cruise like Gerf Hussein temple ” Ptah House”, Dekka Temple , Derr Temple , Wadi Al seboua Temple , Amada Temple ; the oldest of the temples going back to the 18th dynast with restoration work from the 19th dynasty , and at last Abu simbel Temple and Kasr Ibrim.

MORE

Temple of Dekka

Location:

This Temple is located about 100 kilometers south of the Aswan High Dam , in what we refer to today as Nubia. It was moved to the site of el-Sebua , about 40 kilometers upstream, between 1962 and 1968, because of the impendent flooding of the region as a result of the High Dam.

Who built it ?
There are many different opinions about this point. Some scholar says that this temple was built in the 18th dynasty , especially Queen Hatshepsute and King Tutmosis III reign, as they found number of blocks referring to God Horus to whom they dedicate this temple .

Other scholar say that it was actually built by the Nubian king, Akamani, who the Greeks called Ergamenes, in about 220 BC, other scholars claim that it dates as earlier as Ptolemy II Philadelphus 282-246

Explanation
El-Dakka was known to the Egyptians as Pselqet and to the Greeks as Pselchis. This Temple nowadays, sits on a small bluff.

It Consists of a facade, pylon, a courtyard and two sanctuaries. It is considered the only Nubian temple with a facade that faces to the north and oriented north-south to parallel the course of the Nile.

The pylon of the temple is now separated from the remainder of the temple due to the missing enclosure walls of the open court. Above the entrance of the pylon, a solar disk with a uraeus extends its wings. On the southern side of the temple, a small entrance leads into the interior of the pylon and to a stairway that communicates with several internal rooms.

After the open courtyard, the facade of the pronaosis adorned with reliefs of a Ptolemaic King sacrificing to various deities. Beyond the pronaos, the temple has two sanctuaries, one built by Arkamani and then a second one added by Augustus.

It contains many reliefs which depicted the Nubian king making offerings to local gods of Aswan . Some of the best of these reliefs portray Anqet, the goddess of Aswan with her elaborate feathered headdress, and the lion-headed goddess Sekhmet. Other scenes depict the king making offerings to not only Thoth, but also Isis and Tefnut.

The temple is decorated with many religion scenes and important relief.Like most of the other Nubian monuments it was converted into a church during the Christian era.

It should also be noted that at the modern site of El-Dakka temple, not only do we find the temple of El-Sebua , but also the small Maharraka temple, dating from Roman times and dedicated to Serapis and Isis. Interestingly, this small temple contains the only spiral staircase in any Nubian temple

MORE

Mohrakka Temple

Location :

The temple of Mohrakka is located fifty miles to the north of Dekka Temple .

Who built it?

It was built during the Greek Roman period

Why it was built?

It was dedicated to Isis and Serapis .

Explanation:

It is a small and simple temple; it is consisting of one hall with columns decorated with composite capitals. The only remains are those of the hypostyle hall. There are some decorations, but they have never been completed.

MORE

Tomb of Pennut

Location:

It is located in Aniba, South Aswan, near Amada Temple.

 

Who built it?

This tomb belongs to one of the officials who lived at the time of Ramsis IV and was called Pennut; he was overseer of the province of Aniba.

 

Why it was built?

It was built for Pennut to be buried in it.

Explanation:
The tomb is a rock cut tombs. It is consist of antechamber, then a niche where there are the remains of three destroyed statues.
The chamber has scenes of Pennut offerings to the gods, and others represent the funeral and the final judgments. However, large sections of wall inscriptions have been cut away.

MORE

Kiosk of Kertassi

Location:

It is situated south of Kalabsha temple , due to the rising waters of Lake Nasser after the construction of the High Aswan Dam, it was moved to another place the same as all the Nubian monument .

 

Who built it?

It was built during the Greek Roman period.

 

Why it was built?

It was built to dedicate Goddess Isis.

Explanation:It is a building of Two Hathor-headed capped columns flank the entrance. The rest are an architrave with 4 columns; 2 connected with each other, the other 2 with a crossbeam. The capitals of the columns contain fine carvings of date palms and grape vines.

MORE